Tag: game

This Game Sucks A Guide To Giving New Games a Chance

It’s hard to get into a new groove once we’ve settled into a favorite pattern of doing something and that includes playing new games or trying a new game system. It’s important to remember however that just because you’re not used to the way a new game plays or the way that a new system runs – it doesn’t mean that there’s something wrong with it. The following offers some advice on how to get over the hurdle of giving new games a chance.

1. Accept the errors of your ways. Nothing is perfect and that includes video games, the system that it plays on, and dare we say – even you! While trying a new game, you’re bound to trip all over the place and make even some of the most goofiest mistakes that anyone could ever make. Try to remember that flaws are inevitable and the even the master of all masters (that’s you) can blunder your way through a new game. Mistakes don’t make you a terrible player. On the other hand, they don’t make the game stupid or dumb. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. If you find yourself making mistakes during a new game, it’s time that to slow down and give this game a second and more serious look. If something in the game tripped you up – you, the master of all masters – then the game couldn’t be as bad as you first thought.

2. Play a new game when you’re “in the mood”. What a fast-paced world we live in! So fast, that we mistakenly expect to understand a game within the first 5 minutes of putting into the console! Then when we’re not sure of what to do, the game becomes confusing, or just dumb. Never try a new game when you’re not in the mood to or when you’re in a rush. New games require patience and a thorough read of its manual.

3. See the positive. There’s something good about every video game – even the more violent ones (although we’re not prepared to defend violent video games). While checking out a new game, think about what you like about the game as opposed to what you can’t quite figure out what to do yet. A positive attitude will carry on to other aspects of the game and before you know it, you’ll be encouraged to carry on with it and make some real progress.

4. Don’t be such a know it all. In other words, don’t be blinded by your own conceit or skills in a particular genre of games that you close yourself off to new ways of accomplishing tasks. The biggest room is the room for improvement and your room is no exception. Understand that the game you’re playing may have something new to teach you about gaming as a whole. Then revel in it.

5. Continue to play. It’s highly doubtful that anyone will like a new game in one day. Keep playing a new game until you’re absolutely sure that you don’t ever want to see it in your console again.

6. Play by yourself. It’s quite possible that if you play a new game with a friend, you’ll be vulnerable to accepting your friend’s feelings about the game as your own. Play a new game by yourself so that you can interpret your own feelings about the game and not anyone else’s.

PPPPP

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What’s Up With NintendoDS? A Guide of What’s Available for the NintendoDS System

If you’re looking for a game system that comes with a butt-load of inexpensive games, you come to the right place. No other gaming system on the market today hosts as many games at such low prices as the handheld NintendoDS System. Nor does any other gaming system on the market cater to such a young audience.

More appropriate for young gamers than teens or adults, NintendoDS games bring back the SuperMario flavor that we’ve all come to love. Pokemon is still as strong as ever with this system as well, however we’ve noticed a few new games (and types of games) thrown into the mix too.

This article describes some of the accessories and games available for this particular sytem that everyone can enjoy.

The NintendoDS System. This isn’t your regular GameBoy system of yesteryear. The new NintendoDS System has a high-powered flat, folding handheld gaming device complete with bright color touch screen technology – all available for only $129.99.

NintendoDS Accessories. Like the games that this system plays, its accessories are just as plentiful – fully appreciated by the serious gamer on the go. You can get a $14.99 headset for those quiet moments, and sport your system in a small $9.99 Duo game case, $9.99 ultimate leather case, or $17.99 G-Pak for quick trips or for storage. For $29.99, you can stock up on a multitude of accessories encased in a convenient player pack or settle for quick emergency fixes with the $14.99 value kit. Recharging is a breeze on a $9.99 glow deck.

NintendoDS Games. Looking for games? We’ve separated this part of our guide into two sections: one for children and one for adults. Use caution when purchasing NintendoDS games for players under 18 years of age.

FOR CHILDREN:

Pokemon: Perls $34.99
Pokemon: Diamond $34.99
Pokemon: leaf Green $19.99
Pokemon: Fire Red: $19.99
Pokemon: Emerald: $34.99
Pokemon Ranger $34.99
Pokemon: Mystery Dungeon Blue $34.99
Pokemon: Mystery Dungeon Red $34.99
Yoshie’s Island DS $34.99
Wario: master of Disguise $34.99
Big Brain Academy $19.99
Brain Age: Train Your Brain in Minutes a Day $19.99
Nintendogs: Dalmatian & Friends $34.99
Custom Robo Arena $34.99
Diddy Kong Racing DS $ 34.99
Kirby Squeak Squad $4.99
Mario Hoops 3 on 3 $34.99
Mario Kart DS $34.99
Mario Vs. Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis $34.99
New Super Mario Bros. $34.99
Cats $29.99
Horsez $29.99
Dogz $29.99
Settlers II $29.99
Lost in Blue 2 $29.99
Spectrobes $ 29.99
SNK vs. Capcon Card Fighters $29.99
Purr Pals $29.99
Cooking Mama $19.99

COMING SOON:
Diner Dash
Pony Friends
Dragon Ball Z: Harukanaru
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NOTE: Harukanaru’s fighting style in the new version of Dragon Ball Z for NintendoDS differs from the style in its 2005 predecessor. In Dragon Ball Z: Harukanaru, players battle using the turn-base action formula.

FOR ADULTS:

COMING SOON:
Touch the Dead

NOTE: Touch of the Dead is rated M for Mature Audiences, and exhibits the arcade shooter style. Please remember to follow the guidelines set by the Entertainment Software Rating Board (ESRB) when buying games for children under the age of 18. Here’s a handy reference to what the ratings mean:

C = Appropriate for Early childhood
E = Appropriate for Everyone
E 10+ = Appropriate for Everyone aged 10 and older
T = Appropriate for Teens
M = Appropriate for Mature Adults